International Shipping of Statues and Toast

What would you ship home from your life overseas?
Crown label
We packed up our stuff in India on 5 December – remember this picture? Twelve weeks later everything has been unpacked on the distant drumlin.

The packers from Crown Relocations did a great job at both ends of the move, from wrapping each item in plenty of paper, numbering and (creatively) labelling the cardboard boxes, and carrying the heavy furniture out of an Indian villa and into an Irish farmhouse.

What happened between Palm Meadows and the distant drumlin? After our shipment was cleared by Customs authorities in India, a wooden crate was built around the boxes, and the crate was loaded inside a container for shipping.  The ship was delayed at least once by port congestion in Sri Lanka, but it finally arrived in the port of Felixstowe in England, ready to face UK Customs.

Crown Relocations dismantled the wooden crate in the south of England, and waited for the wind and rain to stop. When they spotted a gap in the weather, they sent the boxes in a van by road to Scotland, by ferry across the Irish Sea to Belfast, and by road again up to the top of the drumlin.

We had one heavy item in its own crate – everything else was just in cardboard.

crate

Here are some packing lessons, from the collective wisdom (from our foolish past experiences) of my expat friends and me.

1.  If the waste-paper baskets around your home are full of rubbish on moving day, don’t pack the trash and cart it halfway round the world.

2.  If you are eating breakfast when the packers come, don’t let them pack the toast inside the toaster.

3.  If your serviced apartment is full of items thoughtfully provided by the letting company, don’t steal them!  (This is the only one that actually happened to us. We were leaving Shanghai, and opened the boxes back in London to find coat-hangers, hairdryers and umbrellas all labelled with the landlord’s name).

4.  Don’t let the movers pack your passport just before your international move.

5.  Do clean the BBQ.  If insects have crawled in there to explore the crumbs of meat, you may end up fumigating your new house.

6.  Do bring the beautiful statue that you bought in India.  Will it still look good without the backdrop of sunshine and bougainvillea? Yes of course it will.

Buddha

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9 Comments Add yours

  1. By all those don’t am I to understand these have actually happened to you? Eek! Love your statues new home!

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  2. Karolyn Cooper says:

    No – we are not that unlucky! The passport, toast and bin disasters happened to my friends; and the fumigation story came from the Crown Relocation driver – thankfully he only told us AFTER he had unloaded all of our cockroach-free boxes.

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  3. 4.5 And don’t let them pack your handbag containing your purse and your house keys either! (yes, that did happen to me…)

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    1. Karolyn Cooper says:

      That’s mad- hope you realised in time to retrieve everything?

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      1. No, I didn’t… so, I spent my very last evening in London trapped in the flat, instead of being out with my pals! Grrrrrr….!

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  4. They packed our trash in the trash can that didn’t have a lid. They packed empty boxes that were open. They packed my mother’s purse in 1967 (so it’s not a new problem). They packed their own packing materials….!

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    1. Karolyn Cooper says:

      Sounds like they would have packed you too, if you had stayed still for too long.

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  5. Ha! Good tips. I think we’ve done the rubbish one. Also: if you have tiny, tiny toys, don’t let them wrap the toys individually in paper and then accidentally throw them out at the other end. But I like yours better. Especially the last one.

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    1. Karolyn Cooper says:

      We had loads of crumpled paper, and as far as I know, no tiny items left in the boxes. But I can just imagine precious little toys and components being thrown out.

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