Robins

I saw a lovely photo of a European robin (Erithacus rubecula) this week, taken by a blogger from India who saw his first robin on a recent trip to the UK.  It made me smile to think that a bird so common in my part of the world was special to a visitor from another part of the world.  Just to prove that I don’t take the robin for granted, here are three recent images.

Robin number one: Eating an insect at Kiltonga Nature Reserve, Newtownards on 18 April.

Kiltonga robin feeding (1)

Robin number two: showing off an unruly feather in Belmont Park, Belfast on 7 April.

Robin in Belmont Park 3 (1)

Robin number three: perched in the garden at Mount Stewart near Greyabbey, County Down on 20 April.

Robin at Mount Stewart 1

I hope the robins know that we locals appreciate them as much as the visitors do.  And do you know why?  It’s because they stick around.  They don’t just show up for the summer; they are here all through the winter.

Robin in snow 2 Robin in snow 1

The robins are more loyal than me.  When it snows like that, I’m thinking fondly of Bangalore winters.

Click here to read the blogpost by Amit at Residual Thoughts which inspired this post.

 

 

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16 Comments Add yours

  1. Beautiful pictures! 🙂

    I have never seen a robin either. They aren’t common in India, or maybe they aren’t found here at all – I am not sure. I would love to see one in real life some time.

    Like

    1. Karolyn Cooper says:

      I’m so pleased to see your comment. I was hoping that these birds would interest people from other countries, even if I sometimes take them for granted.

      Like

  2. Kim in Fiji says:

    More than “like”…. LOVE !! Such sweet birds and such lovely photos of them. I envy your steady hands, or I covet your tripod 🙂 Big hugs

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Karolyn Cooper says:

      The robins are good at posing. I got several shots of each of them before they moved.

      Like

  3. linnetmoss says:

    These are stunning photos. You must have a REAL camera 🙂
    And it’s true, the European robin is very special to those of us who don’t live there. In the US we have a “robin” with a red breast but he’s quite a different bird.

    Like

    1. Karolyn Cooper says:

      I just googled the American robin. Now I know what you mean – different bird. The European robin is all sweetness until another robin shows up; then they fight. So you can warn your American robins to stay on their side of the Atlantic.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Karolyn Cooper says:

        And about the camera, yes, it was a DSLR with a big heavy lens, and co-operative birds. Robins do make it easy, because they aren’t so scared of humans.

        Like

      2. linnetmoss says:

        LOL. The poor American robin is burdened with the species name Turdus, so I feel sorry for him. Also he’s not as cute as his European counterpart.

        Like

      3. linnetmoss says:

        Oops, I mean genus name. The species name is “migratorius”.

        Like

        1. Karolyn Cooper says:

          The unfortunate Turdus name also belongs to the beautiful birds I posted here: https://distantdrumlin.wordpress.com/2015/04/07/a-crush-on-a-thrush/
          And then in English we call them “thrush” which isn’t much better.

          Liked by 1 person

  4. Andrew says:

    It is easy to neglect our common birds. I always enjoy Robins, Blackbirds and the like. They are part of my daily life and I would be lost without them.

    Like

    1. Karolyn Cooper says:

      And blogging gives us an extra excuse to show off the local birds, so that the readers from around the world can see them.

      Like

  5. They are pretty 🙂 How about bullfinches? Can you track some down for us…?

    Like

    1. Karolyn Cooper says:

      That’s a challenge. Will chaffinches do? I’ve got loads of them.

      Like

      1. Nope. Soz. But I might accept a goldfinch as a stand-in.

        Like

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